“He used to pick me up and just drop his weight on him, so I couldn’t breathe,” says Reggie White’s son. “It was really scary.” B/R has the story of how a man who fought and won two Super Bowls became abusive to his family.

Reggie White is a former NFL player, and he used to pick my dad up and just drop his weight on him.

Many NFL broadcasters are dissatisfied with how referees protect quarterbacks these days. Most of these sports journalists, though, did not play the position and do not have the same family background as former NFL quarterback and current pundit Chris Simms. His football ancestry and personal experience give him a bit more clout when it comes to safeguarding quarterbacks.

The new quarterback safety rules, according to Chris Simms, have “gone overboard.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kdfY 7-56hM

Pittsburgh Panthers quarterback and top NFL prospect Kenny Pickett scored the game’s first touchdown on a 58-yard running touchdown in the ACC Championship Game. The fact that the college quarterback utilized a fake slide to freeze opponents and burst away for the end zone made the run much more impressive.

Many praised the play as a masterful trick by a shrewd quarterback. Others, on the other hand, said it took advantage of football’s safety laws, which ensure that the quarterback is protected at all costs.

Chris Simms, an NFL commentator, fits into the latter type.

Simms was asked what he thought of the play by Dan Patrick, and he responded:

It makes me feel nauseous! I’m fed up with it. I’m tired of hearing about how important it is to protect the quarterback. That’s almost as though you’re cheating. It’s unethical. It is, in fact. [Pickett] does not irritate me. Do not despise the player. I despise the game. That is something I am aware of. But, in my opinion, this is another another tidbit of evidence that shows that shielding the quarterback has gone too far.

Chris Simms discusses the regulations that safeguard quarterbacks.

Ex-players often complain about the NFL — and football in general — making life too easy for quarterbacks. Former signal-callers like Simms, on the other hand, don’t often say it.

Simms’ viewpoint on quarterback safety standards may stem from his father’s experiences in the 1980s.

The new restrictions, according to the former NFL quarterback, are the secret to his current longevity at the position.

(L-R) Pro Football Talk Radio's Chris Simms during the 2018 NFL Annual Meetings at the Ritz Carlton Orlando, Great Lakes on March 26, 2018 in Orlando, Florida; Quarterback Phil Simms #11 of the New York Giants throws a pass against while chased by Reggie White of the Philadelphia Eagles circa late 1980's during an NFL football game at Giant Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey. Simms played for the Giants from 1979-93.

(L-R) Pro Football Talk Radio's Chris Simms during the 2018 NFL Annual Meetings at the Ritz Carlton Orlando, Great Lakes on March 26, 2018 in Orlando, Florida; Quarterback Phil Simms #11 of the New York Giants throws a pass against while chased by Reggie White of the Philadelphia Eagles circa late 1980's during an NFL football game at Giant Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey. Simms played for the Giants from 1979-93. Chris Simms, Phil Simms, and Reggie White (from left to right) |

Phil Simms, Chris Simms’ father, was a two-time Pro Bowl and two-time Super Bowl champion quarterback who spent his entire 14-year career with the New York Giants.

Dan Patrick asked Chris whether he believes Tom Brady, who has won seven Super Bowls, would still be playing at the age of 44 if he had played in the NFL in the 1970s before these new QB-centric safety regulations were implemented:

Certainly not! Or the decade of the 1980s. Right! I’d have a hard time believing that. Just witnessing my father, Dan Marino, John Elway, and Troy Aikman take such a battering. Reggie White used to lift up my father and just dump his weight on him before body slamming him. My father’s shoulders are still bearing the brunt of it. He’d have a smidgeon more cartilage. He may be able to toss the ball overhand to his grandchildren, but he is incapable of doing so.

The NFL era of Phil Simms, according to Chris Simms

While it seems like Chris Simms has some bitter grapes from his family, he isn’t fully correct.

Both from a product quality and a human one, the game is considerably better with healthy quarterbacks. It’s excellent to get out of the game having gigantic guys take borderline cheap shots at the smallest (but most essential) individuals on the field.

However, some of the ticky-tack penalties against quarterbacks are getting out of hand these days. When you consider that elite quarterbacks and pocket passers appear to receive more calls than lesser players or running quarterbacks, it’s clear that these calls need to be curtailed.

Playing quarterback is a family affair for Chris Simms.

Chris Simms is warming up in front of his father, Phil Simms, who is today’s CBS color commentator.

— Denver Broncos (@Broncos) on 10/10/09

The Simms family is no stranger to the position of quarterback.

Dad Phil Simms is a Kentucky native who went to Morehead State, which isn’t exactly a football powerhouse. Despite this, according to MSUEagles.com, his 5,545 throwing yards and 32 touchdowns in college earned him the No. 7 overall choice in the 1979 NFL Draft.

The New York Giants were rewarded for taking a risk on a small-school quarterback, according to Phil. Simms passed for 33,462 yards and 199 touchdowns in 14 seasons in New Jersey. In 1993 and 1985, he was named to the Pro Bowl, and he won Super Bowl trophies with the New York Giants in 1986 and 1990 (though backup Jeff Hostetler won in 1990 due to Phil’s foot ailment).

However, Phil is not the only quarterback in his family. Chris, his son, went to the University of Texas and became a much more well-known figure in college. He started 41 games for Texas and passed for 7,097 yards and 58 touchdowns.

Chris was drafted in the third round of the 2003 NFL Draft by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, and he spent five seasons as a backup quarterback with the Buccaneers and the Denver Broncos.

Matt, the younger brother, also played quarterback at Louisville and subsequently Tennessee. Matt passed for 1,779 yards and eight touchdowns in 18 games over his two seasons at Knoxville. The NFL would give Matt a shot because of the Simms name on the back of his jersey.

He was an undrafted free agent for two seasons with his father’s crosstown (or cross-stadium) rival New York Jets, as well as the Buffalo Bills and Atlanta Falcons practice squads.

Pro Football Reference and Sports Reference provided all stats.

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